TWiV 489: CD4 Hunter

Vincent visits Sandra Urdaneta-Hartmann at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia to talk about the development of the mobile video game ‘CD4 Hunter’.

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Fermentation genes in a giant algal virus

TetV infected Tetraselmis

TetV infected Tetraselmis. Arrow indicates virus particle. Inset, single particle. Image credit.

The latest giant virus discovery is Tetraselmis virus 1, which infects green algae. It is unusual because it encodes enzymes involved in fermentation. Green beer, anyone?

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March for Science 2018

March for Science NYCNearly one year ago I was proud to be part of the March for Science in Washington, DC. This year I March for Science in New York City, where I will be the co-Master of Ceremonies together with Jin Kim Montclare. You can download the event guide here.

Please join us and show your support for science in Washington Square Park from 9 AM on Saturday, 14 April. There will be a series of short talks starting at 10 AM, and at noon we will all march downtown to Zuccotti Park. I’ll be wearing a This Week in Virology t-shirt.

 

TWiV 488: Who nose if it will work in humans

The TWiV team reveals that recent mumps virus outbreaks in the US are due to waning vaccine efficacy, and an intranasally delivered small interfering RNA that controls West Nile infection in the brain.

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TWiV 487: Milwaukee viral

At the Medical College of Wisconsin, Vincent talks with current and former members of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology about their work and their careers.

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A Lot of Buzz Around STING

By Gertrud U. Rey

Gertrud Rey is a trained virologist residing in Atlanta, Georgia. During the day, she works as a consultant in a biotech patent law firm, but spends much of her free time as a science communicator. She was a guest on TWiV 179 and 424.

The lack of a suitable animal model for human dengue virus infection and disease has presented considerable challenges for dengue virus vaccine research.

Chimpanzees, rhesus macaques, and the common marmoset, representing apes, Old World monkeys, and New World monkeys, respectively, have been used as model organisms to study dengue. However, although they are permissive for dengue virus infection, they do not develop overt disease. Having good animal models to understand the interaction between dengue virus and the host innate immune response is particularly important for vaccine development.

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Incomplete immunity and the evolution of virulence

Carpodacus mexicanusThe evolution of virulence is a fascinating topic, because it illuminates the fine line between a microbe killing a host and finding a new one to infect. This week I stray from the usual subject to explore a study of bacterial virulence, which provides concepts that are relevant to viruses.

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David Baltimore turns 80

Earlier this month (7 March) David Baltimore, 1975 Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine (and my postdoctoral advisor) turned 80 years old. In celebration I am re-posting two interviews I did with David: one with the TWiV team, and one for Principles of Virology.

If you are in the Los Angeles area, don’t miss David’s 80th Birthday Symposium at CalTech.

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Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and David Baltimore

Vincent, Alan, and Rich celebrate the 100th episode of TWiV by talking about viruses with Nobel Laureate David Baltimore.

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Help fund Viruses and Cells Gordon Research Conference

The Gordon Research Conference on Viruses and Cells is the premier meeting in virology. Held every two years, it covers all areas of virology and is limited to 200 participants to ensure quality and interaction. I know how good this meeting is – I attended for many years and served as co-chair of the meeting in 1995.

Now the meeting needs your help. NIH and foundation support has declined dramatically in recent years (see graph). The organizers of the 2019 meeting need $70,000 to support partial registration and travel costs for 32 speakers, 18 discussion leaders, and selected students and postdocs.

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TWiV 485: Fishing with defective flies

The TWiV posse considers viral insulin-like peptides encoded in fish genomes, and insect antiviral immunity by production of viral DNA from defective genomes of RNA viruses.

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Show notes at microbe.tv/twiv