Microbiology blogs

If you have ever wanted to read other blogs on microbiology, head over to César Sánchez’ Twisted Bacteria, where he has compiled a list of his 20 favorites. There are even some in French, Spanish, and Slovenian (for those, don’t forget Google Translate). Thanks, César.

TWiM 16: ICAAC Live

This Week in Microbiology

Hosts: Vincent RacanielloMichael Schmidt, Arturo Casadevall, Stuart Levy, and David Livermore.

VincentMichael, Arturo, Stuart, and David converse about antimicrobial resistance and why most fungi do not cause disease, at the 51st Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC).

Click the arrow above to play, or right-click to download TWiM 16 (65 MB, .mp3, 90 minutes).

Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunesZune Marketplace, via RSS feed, by email or listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app.

Links for this episode:

Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twim.

This Week in Microbiology (TWiM) #12: Photothermal nanoblades and genome engineering

intracellular modelHosts: Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Margaret McFall-Ngai, and Elio Schaechter

On episode #12 of the podcast This Week in Microbiology, Vincent, Margaret, Michael and Elio review the use of photothermal nanoblades to dissect the Burkholderia intracellular life cycle, and manipulation of chromosomes in vivo for genome-wide codon replacement in E. coli.

Click the arrow above to play, or right click to download TWiM #12 (52 MB, .mp3, 75 minutes).

Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunesZune Marketplace, via RSS feed, by email or listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app.

Links for this episode:

Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twim.

This Week in Microbiology (TWiM) #11: Chickens, antibiotics, and asthma

chicken farmHosts: Vincent RacanielloMichael SchmidtMargaret McFall-Ngai, and Elio Schaecter

On episode #11 of the podcast This Week in Microbiology, Vincent, Margaret, Michael and Elio review the presence of extended spectrum beta-lactamase genes in chicken meat and in humans, and a beneficial effect of Helicobacter pylori colonization on the development of allergen-induced asthma.

Click the arrow above to play, or right click to download TWiM #11 (47 MB, .mp3, 68 minutes).

Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunesZune Marketplace, via RSS feed, by email or listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app.

Links for this episode:

Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twim.

TWiV and TWiM live at ASM General Meeting

twiv twim live 2011 asmgmThe General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology will take place in New Orleans from 21-24 May 2011. This annual meeting covers fundamental microbial cell biology, genetics and physiology, environmental and applied microbiology, microbial ecology, pathogenesis, clinical microbiology, and infectious diseases. This year both This Week and Virology and This Week in Microbiology will be broadcast live from the meeting.  TWiM will air on Sunday, May 22, and TWiV will air on Monday, May 23, both at 2 pm CDT, in Room 232 of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans.

Meeting attendees are welcome to attend and watch the live TWiV and TWiM and submit comments and questions during the show. The podcasts will be broadcast live and archived online at UStream.tv, at MicrobeWorld, and virology blog.

Here are the participants for ASM-GM TWiM and TWiV:

Sunday, 22 May, 2:00 p.m., CDT – This Week in Microbiology with Vincent Racaniello and friends

  • Stanley Maloy, Ph.D., Professor Dean, College of Sciences Associate Director, Center for Microbial Sciences, San Diego State University
  • Michael Schmidt, Ph.D., Professor and Vice Chairman of Microbiology and Immunology, Director, Office of Special Programs, Medical University of South Carolina
  • Nicole Dubilier, Ph.D., Leader of the Symbiosis Group, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology
  • Andreas J. Bäumler, Ph.D., Professor and Vice Chair of Research, Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, Davis
  • David Aronoff, M.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of Michigan
  • Paul Rainey, Ph.D. Professor of Evolutionary Genetics, New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study, Massey University Auckland, Principal Investigator, Allan Wilson Centre for Molecular Ecology & Evolution, and Visiting Professor, Hopkins Microbial Diversity Program, Stanford

Monday, 23 May, 2:00 p.m., CDT – This Week in Virology with Vincent Racaniello and friends

  • Roger Hendrix, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh
  • Harmit Malik, M.D., Associate Member of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and Affiliate Assistant Professor, Genome Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine
  • Rachel Katzenellenbogen, M.D., Assistant Professor, Pediatrics-Section of Adolescent Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine

 

TWiM 6: Antibacterial therapy with bacteriophage: Reality or fiction?

bacteriophage modelHosts: Vincent Racaniello, Cliff Mintz, Michael Schmidt, and Elio Schaecter

On episode #6 of the podcast This Week in Microbiology, Vincent, Cliff, Michael and Elio review the use of bacteriophages to manage infections, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteriophages from urban sewage and river water.

Click the arrow above to play, or right click to download TWiM #6 (57 MB .mp3, 82 minutes).

Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunesZune Marketplace, via RSS feed, by email or listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app.

Links for this episode:

The model of bacteriophage T4 shown in the photo is described here.

Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twim.

TWiM 3: Anthrax, genomics, and the FBI inquiry

Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Cliff Mintz, Jo Handelsman, and Ronald Atlas.

On episode #3 of the podcast This Week in Microbiology, Vincent, Jo, Cliff, and Ron explore the genome analysis done in support of the Amerithrax investigation, and an insecticidal enterotoxin-deficient mutant of Bacillus thurigiensis.

Click the arrow above to play, or right-click to download TWiM #3 (55 MB .mp3, 60 minutes).

Subscribe to TWiM (free) at iTunes, the Zune Marketplace, by the RSS feed, or by email, or listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld App.

Links for this episode:

Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv or leave voicemail at 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twim.

TWiM #2 – The plague, microbial virulence, and the gut microbiome

gut microbiomeOn episode #2 of This Week in Microbiology, Vincent, Cliff, and Michael review a fatal laboratory acquired Yersinia pestis infection, and how gut bacteria control body weight and metabolic activity..

Click the arrow above to play, or right-click to download TWiM #2 (52 MB .mp3, 75 minutes).

Subscribe to TWiM (free) at iTunes, the Zune Marketplace, by the RSS feed, or by email, or listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld App.

Links for this episode:

Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv or leave voicemail at 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twim.

This Week in Microbiology

This Week in MicrobiologyHosts: Vincent Racaniello, Cliff Mintz, Michael Schmidt, and Stanley Maloy

I’m pleased to announce the launch today of This Week in Microbiology, a podcast that explores unseen life on Earth. As with our other podcasts This Week in Virology (TWiV) and This Week in Parasitism (TWiP), we will strive to produce an informal yet informative conversation about microbes which is accessible to everyone, no matter what their science background.

As a science Professor at Columbia University, I have spent my academic career directing a research laboratory focused on viruses. My enthusiasm for teaching inspired me to reach beyond the classroom using new media. TWiM is for everyone who wants to learn about the science of microbiology in a casual way.

While there are no exams or pop quizzes, TWiM does encourage interaction with the audience via comments on specific episodes (see below) and email. Listeners can also use MicrobeWorld to suggest topics for the show by submitting articles or papers to the site and tagging them with twim.

On episode #1 of This Week in Microbiology, Vincent, Cliff, Michael, and Stan discuss transfer of DNA from a human host to a bacterial pathogen, and the ability of dry copper to kill bacteria on contact.

[audio:http://traffic.libsyn.com/twimshow/TWiM_1_-_Neisseria_LINEs_up.mp3 | titles=TWiM 1]

Download TWiM #1 (58 MB .mp3, 63 minutes). To download, right-click or control-click on the link, then select save as.

Subscribe to TWiM (free) at iTunes, the Zune Marketplace, by the RSS feed, or by email, or listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld App.

Links for this episode:

Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv or leave voicemail at 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twim.

Microbiology books for kids

On TWiV 87 a listener asked us to recommend suitable books for children about microbiology. I have since asked for suggestions on Twitter and Facebook, and have begun to compile the following list.

  • The Invisible ABC’s by Rodney P. Anderson
  • The Magic School Bus #6: The Giant Germ by Anne Capeci
  • A World in a Drop of Water by Alvin and Virginia Silverstein
  • The Usborne Complete Book of the Microscope by Kirsteen Rogers
  • Jig, Jiggle, Sneeze by Joy Vitalis
  • Germs Make Me Sick! by Melvin Berger
  • Germ Stories by (Nobel prize winner) Arthur Kornberg (reviewed)
  • Invisible Allies: Microbes that shape our lives by Jeanette Farrell
  • Five Kids & A Monkey Investigate a Vicious Virus by Beth L. Blair
  • DNA is Here to Stay by Fran Balkwill

If you know of good microbiology books for children (ages 5-teen) please add them to the comments section, or email them to virology@virology.ws and I’ll add them to this list.

Update: Thanks to the readers who have sent in their suggestions. They are listed above in the order in which I received them.