Do giant viruses have a CRISPR-like immune system or a protein restriction factor?

Zamilon virophageA battle is brewing between two research groups in Marseille, France that are involved in the discovery and study of giant viruses. Didier Raoul and colleagues believe that they have discovered a CRISPR-like, DNA based defense system in mimivirus that confers resistance to virophage (paper link). Claverie and Abergel disagree: they think that the defense system involves proteins, not nucleic acids (paper link).

Virophages are DNA viruses that can only replicate in cells infected by giant viruses like mimivirus. Their name, which means ‘virus eater’, comes from the observation that they inhibit mimivirus replication. A specific virophage called Zamilon was discovered that can inhibit the replication of lineage B and C mimivirus but not lineage A.

Examination of the DNA sequences of 60 different mimivirus strains revealed that the genomes of lineage A contained a 28 nucleotide sequence identical to Zamilon virophage. This sequence was not found in any lineage B mimivirus and in only one out of 19 lineage C mimiviruses. In addition, a 15 nucleotide subset of this sequence is repeated four times in the lineage B and C mimivirus genomes.

Near the 15 nucleotide Zamilon-derived repeated sequences in lineage B and C mimivirus genomes are genes encoding several proteins related to components of the bacterial CRISPR-Cas system. These include a nuclease, an RNAse, and an ATP-dependent DNA helicase.

The CRISPR system provides defense against invading DNA. When a foreign DNA, such as a bacteriophage genome, enters a bacterial cell, some is fragmented and integrated into the CRISPR locus as a ’spacer’ (sequences in the foreign DNA are called ‘protospacers’). Following transcription, CRISPR RNAs (crRNA) are processed by a multiprotein complex to produce ~60 nucleotide RNAs. When the spacer of a crRNA base pairs with a complementary sequence in an invading DNA molecule, CRISPR-associated endonucleases cleave the DNA. The integration of the sequences of the invading DNA into the host cell genome, from which they can be mobilized in the form of crRNAs, provides a form of “memory” and acquired immunity. It should be noted that there are six known types of CRISPR systems that differ in their components and mechanisms.

Because the CRISPR-Cas system is an adaptive immune system that protects bacteria and Archaea from virus infections and invasion of foreign DNA, the authors propose that they have discovered a new adaptive immune system that protects mimiviruses from virophage infection. They call this system mimivirus virophage resistance element, or MIMIVIRE.

The authors provide experimental support for their hypothesis by showing that silencing the genes encoding the endonuclease, the helicase, and the repeated insert using siRNA allows Zamilon replication in mimivirus-infected cells.

Claverie and Abergel think that Raoult and colleagues are wrong (paper link). They provide three reasons to dispute their findings, and ‘propose a simpler protein-based interaction model that explains the observed phenomena without having to extend the realm of adaptive immunity to the world of eukaryotic viruses, a revolutionary step that would require stronger experimental evidences.’

The first problem is that mimivirus and Zamilon virophage replicate in the same location in the infected cell, making a CRISPR-like defense system difficult to conceptualize. In contrast, CRISPR sequences reside in the bacterial genome, from which RNAs are produced that target the destruction of invading DNAs elsewhere in the cell.

The second problem is that the Zamilon sequences in the mimivirus genome are not regularly spaced or flanked by recognizable repeats, a hallmark of the CRISPR system (the name stands for ‘clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats). However it should be noted that type VI CRISPR systems have no CRISPR locus and likely function via mechanisms that are different from other CRISPR systems.

Finally, Claverie and Abergel argue that there is no way for the proposed nucleic acid defense system to distinguish between the virophage and the virophage sequences in the mimivirus genome. In some CRISPR systems this discrimination is achieved by protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs), short (2-5 nt) sequences next to the invader protospacer sequences that are recognized by the endonuclease complex guided by the crRNA. PAMs are not present in the bacterial genome, sparing it from endonucleolytic cleavage. Nevertheless, non PAM-based mechanisms of discriminating invader from host are known, for example, in the type III CRISPR system.

If Raoult and colleagues have not discovered a CRISPR-like mimivirus defense system, then why would silencing the genes encoding CRISPR-like proteins allow Zamilon replication? Claverie and Abergel think that it is not the 15 nucleotide Zamilon repeats that are important to mimivirus, but the encoded amino acids: Asp-Asn-Glu-Ser (DNES in one letter code). They believe that DNES is a motif present in proteins that block Zamilon replication by as yet unidentified mechanisms.

Many cellular proteins have been identified that interfere with virus replication, such as those encoded by interferon induced genes (ISGs). DNES containing proteins that inhibit Zamilon replication would be conceptually analogous, except that they are encoded by a virus, not the host.

Claverie and Abergele appear to have a strong case that mimivirus defense against Zamilon virophage is mediated by protein, not nucleic acid, but further experimentation is certainly needed to support their position. Nevertheless they recognize that the discovery by Raoult and colleagues “remains fascinating even if it falls short of demonstrating the existence of a CRISPR-Cas-like adaptive immune system”.

TWiV 382: Everyone’s a little bit viral

TWiVOn episode #382 of the science show This Week in Virology, Nels Elde and Ed Chuong join the TWiV team to talk about their observation that regulation of the human interferon response depends on regulatory sequences that were co-opted millions of years ago from endogenous retroviruses.

You can find TWiV #382 at microbe.tv/twiv, or listen below.

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TWiV 367: Two sides to a Coyne

On episode #367 of the science show This Week in Virology, two Coynes join the TWiV overlords to explain their three-dimensional cell culture model of polarized intestinal for studying enterovirus infection.

You can find TWiV #367 at www.microbe.tv/twiv.

Exaptation: A cell enzyme becomes a viral capsid protein

Alphalipothrixvirus virionThe acquisition of a capsid is thought to be a key event in the evolution of viruses from the self-replicating genetic elements that existed during the pre-cellular stage on Earth. The origin of viral capsids has been obscure because their components are not similar to cellular proteins. The discovery that a viral capsid protein evolved from a CRISPR-associated nuclease provides insight into how viruses emerged.

Thermoproteus tenax virus 1 (TTV1) infects the hyperthemophilic archaeon Thermoproteus tenax, which grows at 86°C. The enveloped virus particles are flexible filaments 400 nm long and 40 nm in diameter (illustrated; image credit) built with four capsid proteins, TP1-TP4. The basic proteins TP1 and TP2 bind the 16 kb double-stranded DNA genome to form the nucleocapsid.

Thirty years after the discovery of TTV1, the capsid proteins remained ORFans – meaning that they had no sequence homology with viral or cellular proteins. Recently a more sensitive homology analysis revealed that TP1 is similar to Cas4, a nuclease that is a part of the prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas defense system.

Although TP1 clearly matches the Cas4 protein, it is not complete: codons at the carboxy-terminus are missing. A re-examination of the TTV1 genome sequence revealed a previously undetected open reading frame of 74 codons just downstream of the TP1 gene which are the missing C-terminal residues of the Cas4 nuclease. It is not known if this protein, called gp7, is produced in infected cells; it is not part of the virus particle.

Together the TP1 and gp7 proteins represent a full length Cas4 nuclease. TP1 is probably not catalytically active due to amino acid changes in the active site of the enzyme.

Why does TP1 lack the carboxy-terminal residues of Cas4? The amino terminus of the TP1 protein comprises a positively charged surface that might be involved in binding the viral DNA genome. The same surface in Cas4 is covered by the carboxy-terminal domain of the protein. This observation suggests that transformation of Cas4 from a nuclease into a viral capsid protein probably required removal of this shielding domain, so that the protein could bind the DNA genome.

How did a nuclease become a viral capsid protein? An ancestor of TTV1 might have encoded a Cas4-like protein with nuclease activity with a role in genome replication or repair. Mutations causing loss of nuclease activity might have been followed by truncation of the protein to expose the DNA binding domain, which then became a viral capsid protein. Support for this idea comes from the observation that a Cas4-like protein encoded in the genome of another archaeal virus, the rudivirus SIRV2, has nuclease activity.

Exaptation, a change in the function of a protein during evolution, is known to have taken place in the viral world. The case of Cas4 and TP1 shows that capsid components can evolve from proteins with a very different function.

TWiV 322: Postcards from the edge of the membrane

On episode #322 of the science show This Week in Virology, the TWiVodes answer listener email about hantaviruses, antivirals, H1N1 vaccine and narcolepsy, credibility of peer review, Bourbon virus, influenza vaccine, careers in virology, and much more.

You can find TWiV #322 at www.microbe.tv/twiv.

TWiV 72: Bucket of bolts

Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, and Rich Condit

This week the TWiV team explains CRISPR/Cas, the immune system of bacteria and archaea, how novel viruses are discovered by deep sequencing of small RNAs, and the relationship between dry weather and outbreaks of West Nile virus infection.

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