Principles of Virology, Fourth Edition

Principles of Virology 4th EditionI am pleased to announce the publication by ASM Press of the fourth edition of our virology textbook, Principles of Virology. Two years in the making, this new edition is fully updated to represent the rapidly changing field of virology.

Principles of Virology has been written according to the authors’ philosophy that the best approach to teaching introductory virology is by emphasizing shared principles. Studying the phases of the viral reproductive cycle, illustrated with a set of representative viruses, provides an overview of the steps required to maintain these infectious agents in nature. Such knowledge cannot be acquired by learning a collection of facts about individual viruses. Consequently, the major goal of this book is to define and illustrate the basic principles of animal virus biology.

This edition is marked by a change in the author team. Our new member, Glenn Rall, has brought expertise in viral immunology and pathogenesis, pedagogical clarity, and down-to-earth humor to our work. Although no longer a coauthor, our colleague Lynn Enquist has continued to provide insight, advice, and comments on the chapters.

A major new feature is the inclusion of 26 video interviews with leading scientists who have made significant contributions to the field of virology. These in-depth interviews provide the background and thinking that went into the discoveries or observations connected to the concepts being taught in this text. Students will discover the personal stories and twists of fate that led the scientists to work with viruses and make their seminal discoveries.

Principles of Virology is ideal for teaching the strategies by which all viruses reproduce, spread within a host, and are maintained within populations. It is appropriate for undergraduate courses in virology and microbiology as well as graduate courses in virology and infectious diseases. I have used previous editions of this textbook to build my Columbia University virology course. Volume I: Molecular Biology covers the molecular biology of viral reproduction. Volume II: Pathogenesis & Control addresses the interplay between viruses and their host organisms. The two volumes can be used for separate courses or together in a single course. Each includes a unique appendix, glossary, and links to Internet resources such as websites, podcasts, and blogs.

PoV4 goes on sale the week of 24 August 2015. If you are thinking about using the book for your course, reserve your review copy today at http://www.asm.org/pov.

Watch the video below to hear authors Jane Flint, Vincent Racaniello, Glenn Rall, and Ann Skalka talk about the making of PoV 4.

The American Society for Virology

The American Society for Virology was founded in 1981 to promote the exchange of information and stimulate discussion and collaboration among scientists active in all aspects of virology. These goals are achieved in part by organizing an annual meeting that brings together virologists from diverse fields to discuss their work.

As the current President of the American Society for Virology it is my honor to select the speakers for the morning symposia at the annual meeting. Below are the sessions that I have organized and the speakers that I have selected. Note the titles of the different sessions: Listeners of the science show This Week in Virology should recognize them! In addition to the plenary sessions there are hundreds of other talks, poster sessions, and much more.

The 2015 annual meeting of ASV will be held at Western University in London, Ontario, Canada. It should be a terrific meeting. All virologists are encouraged to attend; registration is now open. I hope to see you there next summer!

Saturday 7/11
Keynote Address – Joan Steitz, Yale University

Sunday 7/12
An inordinate fondness for viruses
Curtis Suttle, University of British Columbia
Christian Drosten, University of Bonn
XJ Meng, Virginia Tech
Steve Wilhelm, University of Tennessee

Monday 7/13
The kind that make you sick
Kanta Subbarao, NIAID, NIH
Theodora Hatziannou, Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Institute
Chioma Okeoma, University of Iowa
Heinz Feldmann, NIAID, NIH

Tuesday 7/14
Bucket of bolts
Britt Glaunsinger, University of California, Berkeley
Paula Traktman, Medical College of Wisconsin
Ileana Cristea, Princeton University
Leslie Parent, Penn State
James (Zhijian) Chen, UT Southwestern Medical Center

Wednesday 7/15
Virocentricity
Eugene Koonin, NCBI, NIH
Mart Krupovic, Institut Pasteur
Kenneth Stedman, Portland State University
Susana Lopez Charreton, UNAM, Cuernavaca
Karen Mossman, McMaster University

TWiV 291: Ft. Collins abuzz with virologists

Vincent, Rich, and Kathy and their guests Clodagh and Ron recorded episode #291 of the science show This Week in Virology at the 33rd annual meeting of the American Society for Virology at Colorado State University in Ft. Collins, Colorado.

You can find TWiV #291 at www.microbe.tv/twiv.

TWiV 193: Live at ASV in Madison

On episode #193 of the science show This Week in Virology, recorded at the 31st Annual Meeting of the American Society for Virology in Madison, Vincent, Rich, Carolyn, and Sara discussed genetic conflict between viral and human genes, and how the placenta protects the fetus against viral infection.

You can find TWiV #193 at www.microbe.tv/twiv.

Herpetic Legion – Reactivation

Herpetic LegionWe all know that virologists love to dance. But did you know that they can also perform in a rock band?

At the recently concluded 2012 meeting of the American Society for Virology in Madison, WI, seven virologists and a neurobiologist, members of the band Herpetic Legion, entertained meeting attendees with a mix of old and new rock and roll. You can view a video of their performance below or on YouTube.

Herpetic Legion is Joel Baines (vocals, bass guitar), Ian Mohr (drums), John Parker (guitar), Phil Pellett (guitar), Michele Bialecki (vocals), Amy Hudson (vocals, cow bell), and Cheryl Stucky (flute). Richard Lloyd made a guest appearance for two songs on guitar (the virologist, not the rock star).

It was a terrific performance, demonstrating that scientists can do many things. Thanks, Herpetic Legion!