Viruses on Time

Poliovirus recently made the cover of Time magazine. Prompted by a reader question, I searched the Time archive to find out if there have been other virology-themed covers. I found fifteen in all, depicting poliovirus (3), herpesvirus (1), HIV/AIDS (4), influenza (5), and SARS coronavirus (2) (I did not distinguish between US and international editions).

The earliest virus-themed cover that I found has Jonas Salk on the cover of the 29 March 1954 issue. Behind Salk is an image of poliovirus particles, probably drawn from an electron micrograph. Salk’s field trial of inactivated poliovirus vaccine had begun in 1954, and in April of the next year the results would be announced:

Jonas Salk

John Enders made the cover of the 17 November 1961 issue, with poliovirions in the background. Enders had been awarded the Nobel Prize in 1954, along with Weller and Robbins, for being the first to propagate the virus in cell culture. This finding paved the way for Salk’s vaccine work.

John Enders

Viruses were not on the cover of Time for 23 years. The 2 August 1982 cover did not have a virus image, but touted herpes simplex virus as ‘Today’s scarlet letter”:

herpes

The 4 July 1983 cover featured disease detectives and AIDS:

AIDS

AIDS returned on 12 August 1985, this time with an image of HIV:

AIDS threat

The 3 November 1986 cover featured the giant headline VIRUSES with a colorized scanning electron micrograph in the background. AIDS was also mentioned:

Viruses

The Man of the Year for 1996 was virologist David Ho, who graced the cover of the 30 December 1996 issue, with virions reflected in his glasses. This is one of the coolest of the Time virus covers, in my opinion. Naming Ho Man of the Year was fully deserved and helped propel the virology field into the spotlight it deserved.

David Ho

The cover of the 23 February 1998 issue features the flu hunters and a background electron micrograph of influenza virus. This story followed the 1997 outbreak of influenza H5N1 in Hong Kong:

Flu hunters

The Hong Kong outbreak was also featured on the 9 March 1998 cover, with influenza virions in the green lettering:

Flu hunters 2

The SARS outbreak made the 5 May 2003 cover. There were two versions distributed in different countries:

SARS

SARS Nation

Avian influenza was later featured on two more covers, 9 February 2004 and 26 September 2005:

Bird flu

Death threat

The 2009 influenza H1N1 pandemic was on the cover of the 24 August 2009 issue:

H1N1

And the latest virus on the cover is poliovirus, 14 January 2013:

Killing polio

Did I miss any?

The following covers did not feature viruses but were certainly relevant to virology. The antiviral interferon was featured on the 31 March 1980 issue:

Interferon

Herbert Boyer, one of the pioneers of recombinant DNA technology, was on the 9 March 1981 issue:

Herbert Boyer

The 23 May 1998 cover featured a story on how the immune system fights off disease:

Immune system

Science under siege (sound familiar?) was the story on the 12 September 1994 issue:

Science under siege

The 12 September 1994 Time cover asked if we are losing the war against infectious diseases:

Killer microbes

 There have been 6,169 Time covers, and viruses have been featured on only fifteen. I understand that Time is not a science magazine, but I think it could do more for virology, and science in general (there were other science themed covers that I found, but not that many more).

I wonder how many viruses have been on the cover of Newsweek? Life Magazine? Scientific American?

HIV among US youth

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released its latest estimates on the number of new HIV infections in the United States:

HIV remains a serious health problem, with an estimated 47,500 people becoming newly infected with the virus in the United States in 2010. Youth make up 7% of the more than 1 million people in the US living with HIV. About 12,000 youth were infected with HIV in 2010. The greatest number of infections occurred among gay and bisexual youth. Nearly half of all new infections among youth occur in African American males.

Included is this graph of at-risk populations:

At risk for HIV

Clearly awareness of HIV and how it is spread is not enough to prevent new infections. Would an effective HIV vaccine make a difference?

A pdf version of the factsheet is available for download.

Behind the scenes: TWiV 202 at the University of Nebraska

We recorded This Week in Virology #202 at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, Nebraska on 5 October 2012, as part of the 12th Annual Symposium in Virology. Terence Dermody, Shou-Wei Ding, Grant McFadden and I spoke about our research, and then we recorded TWiV with University of Nebraska virologists James Van Etten, T. Jack Morris, and Charles Wood.

I was impressed by the fine virology being done at the Nebraska Center for Virology, as well as the collegiality of the virology community in Nebraska, Iowa, South Dakota, and Kansas – Symposium attendees were from all of those states! I met many young virologists at the poster session and I was touched by how many of them wanted to say hello and thank us for doing TWiV.

Many thanks to all the virologists who came to the Symposium and stayed to watch TWiV. Special thanks to Charles Wood, the Director of the Nebraska Center for Virology, who participated in TWiV #202 along with T. Jack Morris and James Van Etten.

Here are some behind the scenes photographs of this short but very informative visit.

TWiV 202: Huskers go viral

In episode #202 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vincent travels to the University of Nebraska to meet with members of the Nebraska Center for Virology and discuss their work on algal viruses, plant viruses, HIV and Kaposi’s sarcoma herpesvirus.

You can find TWiV #202 at www.microbe.tv/twiv.

TWiV 168: Super CalTech prophylaxis and ferret runny noses

adeno-associated virusHosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson DespommierRich ConditAlan Dove, and Welkin Johnson

Welkin joins the TWiV team for a discussion of HIV prophlaxis using vectored antibodies, and the influenza H5N1 virus studies in ferrets that were not redacted.

Click the arrow above to play, or right-click to download TWiV 168 (59 MB .mp3, 98 minutes).

Subscribe to TWiV (free) in iTunes , at the Zune Marketplace, by the RSS feed, by email, or listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app.

Links for this episode:

Weekly Science Picks

Welkin – Virtual PI (Nature)
DicksonDrain the Ocean
RichNova: To the Moon
Alan – Robert Falcon Scott on Twitter and the Terra Nova expedition
VincentHello, Mr. Chips (I, Cringely)

Listener Pick of the Week

CharlotteAnd the Band Played On

Send your virology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twiv@microbe.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twiv.

TWiV 164: Six steps forward, four steps back

xmrvHosts: Vincent RacanielloRich Condit, and Alan Dove

Vincent, Alan, and Rich review ten compelling virology stories of 2011.

Please help us by taking our listener survey.

Click the arrow above to play, or right-click to download TWiV 164 (60 MB .mp3, 99 minutes).

Subscribe to TWiV (free) in iTunes , at the Zune Marketplace, by the RSS feed, by email, or listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app.

Ten virology stories of 2011:

  1. XMRV, CFS, and prostate cancer (TWiV 119, 123, 136, 150)
  2. Influenza H5N1, ferrets, and the NSABB (TWiV 159)
  3. The Panic Virus (TWiV 117)
  4. Polio eradication (TWiV 127, 149)
  5. Viral oncotherapy (TWiV 124, 131, 142, 156)
  6. Hepatitis C virus (TWiV 130, 137, 141)
  7. Zinc finger nuclease and HIV therapy (TWiV 144)
  8. Bacteria help viruses (TWiV 154)
  9. Human papillomaviruses (TWiV 126)
  10. Combating dengue with Wolbachia (TWiV 115, 147)

Links for this episode:

Weekly Science Picks

Rich – Fundamentals of Molecular Virology by Nicholas H. Acheson
AlanFetch, with Ruff Ruffman
Vincent – Year end reviews at Rule of 6ix and Contagions

Listener Pick of the Week

GarrenTrillion-frame-per-second video
Judi – iBioMagazine
Ricardo –
Brain Picking’s 11 best science books of 2011

Send your virology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twiv@microbe.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twiv.

TWiV 146: Draco’s potion

dracoHosts: Vincent RacanielloRich Condit, and Abbie Smith

Vincent, Rich, and Abbie review a broad spectrum antiviral protein, and selective pressure applied by a failed HIV-1 vaccine.

Click the arrow above to play, or right-click to download TWiV 146 (78 MB .mp3, 107 minutes).

Subscribe to TWiV (free) in iTunes , at the Zune Marketplace, by the RSS feed, by email, or listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app.

Links for this episode:

Weekly Science Picks

Vincent – Hypothetical Risk: Cambridge City Council’s Hearings on Recombinant DNA Research
Rich –
Z Corporation 3-D printer (YouTube)

Listener Pick of the Week

JimDo-it-yourself DNA extraction (Citizen Scientist Quarterly)

Send your virology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twiv@microbe.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twiv.

TWiV 144: HIV gets the (zinc) finger

zinc finger nucleaseHosts: Vincent Racaniello, Rich Condit, and Alan Dove

Vincent, Rich, and Alan discuss live blogging of scientific meetings, the current outbreak of Hendra virus is Australia, and using zinc finger nucleases to make HIV-resistant CD4 cells.

Click the arrow above to play, or right-click to download TWiV 144 (75 MB .mp3, 104 minutes).

Subscribe to TWiV (free) in iTunes , at the Zune Marketplace, by the RSS feed, by email, or listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app.

Links for this episode:

Weekly Science Picks

Alan – Bugscope
Rich –
Vaccine adverse events: Causal or coincidental? (Lancet)
Vincent – West Nile Story by Dickson Despommier (Kindle edition)

Send your virology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twiv@microbe.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twiv.

TWiV 143: Live at ASV in Minneapolis

asv minneapolisHosts: Vincent Racaniello, Rich Condit, Julie Overbaugh, and Stacey Schultz-Cherry

Vincent, Rich, Julie and Stacey recorded TWiV at the 30th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Virology in Minneapolis, where they discussed the role of neutralizing antibodies in protection against HIV-1 infection, and astroviruses, agents of gastroenteritis.

Click the arrow above to play, or right-click to download TWiV 143 (48 MB .mp3, 66 minutes).

Subscribe to TWiV (free) in iTunes , at the Zune Marketplace, by the RSS feed, by email, or listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app.

Links for this episode:

Weekly Science Picks

Rich – Iter – building a fusion reactor
Vincent – American girls sweep at Google science fair (NY Times)

Listener Pick of the Week

JingBees by Rudolph Steiner

Send your virology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twiv@microbe.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twiv.

TWiV 140: An aptitude for microbicides

cd4 aptamer

Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Judy Lieberman

Vincent, Alan, Rich, and Judy Lieberman review the use of CD4 aptamer-siRNA chimeras to inhibit HIV transmission.

Click the arrow above to play, or right-click to download TWiV #140 (110 MB .mp3, 92 minutes).

Subscribe to TWiV (free) in iTunes , at the Zune Marketplace, by the RSS feed, by email, or listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app.

Links for this episode:

Weekly Science Picks

Alan – Inside insides
Rich – Rock stars of science
Vincent – A new open-access journal, and Francis Collins on NIH budget

Listener Pick of the Week

Kathy – Scientists and musicians compare notes (NPR)

Send your virology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twiv@microbe.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twiv.