Virology lecture #11: Assembly

1 March 2010


Download: .wmv (354 MB) | .mp4 (104 MB)

Visit the virology W3310 home page for a complete list of course resources.

  • gsgs

    I could watch this one with AOL. Being primarily interested in flu, I wondered:

    can 2 non-infective particles with missing segments together be infective in the same cell ?
    if only 0ne in 400 viruses are infective then an awful lot of cells are partially infected
    and disturbed invain before the infection process somehow can't proceed. Host and virus
    don't want this…
    where are the addresses of viral parts where to move
    or the packaging signals ? I've read it's encoded in nucleotides, not amino-acids
    but the “assembler” only sees the nucleocapsid-complexes not the enclosed nucleotides
    no more coughing in NY in March in accordance with NY-ILI-charts

  • Ngunjiri_JM

    Reply to GSGS,

    1. Two noninfectious influenza virus particles can initiate infection if the defective or missing gene segment is not the same, i.e. for example if one particles is missing a polymerase whilst the other lacks the M gene segment they will complement each other. This is called multiplicity-dependent reactivation.
    2. We study biological activities of influenza noninfectious particles. By noninfectious I mean a particle that can enter the cell but fail to replicate and produce new particles [that can infect new host cells]. These particles particles are important in for examples, inducing interferon, interfering with the replication of [fellow] infectious particles during coinfection, or killing the host cell thereby reducing the number of competent cells for replication of infectious particles. This latter function is unfortunately accompanied by enhanced pathogenesis.

  • Ngunjiri_JM

    Reply to GSGS,

    1. Two noninfectious influenza virus particles can initiate infection if the defective or missing gene segment is not the same, i.e. for example if one particles is missing a polymerase whilst the other lacks the M gene segment they will complement each other. This is called multiplicity-dependent reactivation.
    2. We study biological activities of influenza noninfectious particles. By noninfectious I mean a particle that can enter the cell but fail to replicate and produce new particles [that can infect new host cells]. These particles particles are important in for examples, inducing interferon, interfering with the replication of [fellow] infectious particles during coinfection, or killing the host cell thereby reducing the number of competent cells for replication of infectious particles. This latter function is unfortunately accompanied by enhanced pathogenesis.