TWiV 63: Melting pot virus

20 December 2009

marseillevirus_genomeHosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, and Rich Condit

On episode 63 of the podcast This Week in Virology, Vincent, Alan, and Rich talk about US government contract for freeze-dried smallpox vaccine, red squirrels in the UK threatened by poxvirus, and Marseillevirus, another DNA virus from amoebae built for comfort and speed.

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Weekly Science Picks
Rich Infectious Awearables
Alan Darwine
Vincent Microbial Art

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  • KTSword

    Just one little notation to add to the Viral Diseases of Humans PDF regarding HHV-6.

    According to the HHV-6 Foundation, of which Dr. Dharam Ablashi co-discoverer of HHV-6 is the Scientific Director, there are two distinct variants of HHV-6. HHV-6A is the strain most likely to be found in MS, CFS and AIDS and cancer patients. HHV-6B causes roseola, febrile illnesses and encephalitis in infants and reactivates in transplant patients, causing complications such as encephalitis, pneumonitis and liver failure. HHV-6B infects close to 100% of children by the age of two, causing mild flu-like symptoms and rash in some, but occasionally progresses to high fever, encephalitis and seizures. In most cases, the virus goes into latency. However, in patients with impaired immune function, the virus may persist in its active state at low levels for years.

    While it is generally known that HHV-6 causes roseola and occasional seizures and encephalitis in infants, most physicians do not realize that HHV-6 can persist in a subacute form causing CNS dysfunction. HHV-6 can also cause selective immune suppression and alterations in cytokines that make it more difficult for the body to fend off cancer, intracellular pathogens, viruses and mycobacteria. Finally, HHV-6 has potent transactivating properties that cause it to stimulate other viruses, such as EBV, CMV and HHV-8.

    http://www.hhv-6foundation.org/overview.html

  • KTSword

    Just one little notation to add to the Viral Diseases of Humans PDF regarding HHV-6.

    According to the HHV-6 Foundation, of which Dr. Dharam Ablashi co-discoverer of HHV-6 is the Scientific Director, there are two distinct variants of HHV-6. HHV-6A is the strain most likely to be found in MS, CFS and AIDS and cancer patients. HHV-6B causes roseola, febrile illnesses and encephalitis in infants and reactivates in transplant patients, causing complications such as encephalitis, pneumonitis and liver failure. HHV-6B infects close to 100% of children by the age of two, causing mild flu-like symptoms and rash in some, but occasionally progresses to high fever, encephalitis and seizures. In most cases, the virus goes into latency. However, in patients with impaired immune function, the virus may persist in its active state at low levels for years.

    While it is generally known that HHV-6 causes roseola and occasional seizures and encephalitis in infants, most physicians do not realize that HHV-6 can persist in a subacute form causing CNS dysfunction. HHV-6 can also cause selective immune suppression and alterations in cytokines that make it more difficult for the body to fend off cancer, intracellular pathogens, viruses and mycobacteria. Finally, HHV-6 has potent transactivating properties that cause it to stimulate other viruses, such as EBV, CMV and HHV-8.

    http://www.hhv-6foundation.org/overview.html