TWiV 54: Professor Lynn Enquist, virology luminary

18 October 2009

twiv-200Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Lynn Enquist

On episode 54 of the podcast “This Week in Virology”, Vincent speaks with Lynn Enquist about his career in virology, moving from academia to industry and back. Along the way Prof. Enquist did pioneering research on bacteriophage, participated in the birth of recombinant DNA technology, and studied herpesviruses.

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Weekly Science Picks
Lynn Francis Crick: Hunter of Life’s Secrets by Robert Olby
Vincent ViralZone

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  • gsgs3

    million viruses also in a milliliter of deep ocean water ?
    Or only in surface water near coasts
    200 light years with viruses .. how much with bacteria, mammals,
    RNA,molecules

  • http://www.virology.ws profvrr

    Great question! Viral abundance appears to be very high even in the
    deepest parts of the ocean; it's been studied. It is estimated that
    there are 9 x 10^20 bacteria on earth. That's ten times fewer than
    ocean viruses, but bacterial are about 10-100 times bigger. So the
    distance of bacteria light-years is about the same. RNA and molecules
    would go even farther. Mammals, I don't know – maybe a mammalologist
    can weigh in?

  • gsgs3

    million viruses also in a milliliter of deep ocean water ?
    Or only in surface water near coasts
    200 light years with viruses .. how much with bacteria, mammals,
    RNA,molecules

  • http://www.virology.ws profvrr

    Great question! Viral abundance appears to be very high even in the
    deepest parts of the ocean; it's been studied. It is estimated that
    there are 9 x 10^20 bacteria on earth. That's ten times fewer than
    ocean viruses, but bacterial are about 10-100 times bigger. So the
    distance of bacteria light-years is about the same. RNA and molecules
    would go even farther. Mammals, I don't know – maybe a mammalologist
    can weigh in?